Fragile Hair Woes.

Your stylist works hard at keeping your hair in the best condition possible, and most of the time our advice pretty straightforward.  But sometimes hair care can be an elusive and confusing thing if you are dealing with sudden (or not so sudden) changes.   If you’re finding yourself with a head full of frail and breaking hair, there are a few potential culprits that could be causing it.

 

Hormones

photo credit: Stockbyte/Getty Images

photo credit: Stockbyte/Getty Images

When hormones change during puberty, pregnancy, and menopause, it can wreak havoc on hair.  But those aren’t the only times hormones can be imbalanced: Thyroid conditions can also alter the hair’s condition.  Dry, brittle hair that breaks or falls out can be a sign of hypothyroidism, and on the flip side of that, an overactive thyroid can causing thinning hair.  When you notice these changes, or your stylist notices them, you should see your doctor to get some answers.

 

Routine

photo credit: Condé Nast

photo credit: Condé Nast

Let’s say when you go to hot yoga every day, you always wear your hair pulled back in a tight bun, twisted and positioned in the same way each time you do it.  That kind of routine will cause breakage, and by the time you notice, your hair will already be significantly damaged.  The best way to deal with this is to become aware of how you are wearing your hair when it is pulled back and make an effort to switch it up.  Just changing the position of a ponytail or bun will help alleviate the stress from putting it in the same spot all the time.  Also, you’re probably been lectured to death about which elastics to use and which ones not to, but just in case you’ve forgotten, these Emi-Jay ties are still the best for minimizing damage.

 

SubPar Tools

photo credit: Bonnet hair dryer, 1962

photo credit: Bonnet hair dryer, 1962

The rumors are true: Damage and dryness to your hair can be caused by heat styling.  Despite the risk, we still love blow drying our hair and plenty of product lines make lotions and potions specifically designed to protect your hair from excessive heat.  However, there is no point in using great product if you’re pairing it with antiquated tools. A blow dryer should be replaced about every three years.  Pay attention to the way it sounds, smells, and works.  If it rattles, stinks like singed hair (or plastic), and takes forever to dry your hair, it is time to pitch it.  Otherwise you may as well sing the song, Burn, Baby, Burn while you style your hair.

 

Click here for my guide to picking a new blow dryer.

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